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In the News

June 30, 2016

Camp for grieving children has new format
Beverly Citizen (not available online)

Care Dimensions, formerly Hospice of the North Shore & Greater Boston, will hold its 15th Annual Camp Stepping Stones, a special camp opportunity for children and their families who have experienced the death of a loved one. This year’s Camp will be held in a new one-day format on July 16, running from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. with lunch and dinner included. Camp Stepping Stones takes place on the scenic campus of the Glen Urquhart School in Beverly Farms, MA. 

Camp Stepping Stones is designed to give children enjoyable opportunities to help work through issues of grief and loss. With play and fun as its central components, Camp Stepping Stones campers will enjoy traditional camp experiences such as arts and crafts, outdoor games and sports along with special activities for commemorating their loved ones. There are also relaxing activities for parents and guardians including massage, Reiki and yoga, creative art activities and opportunities for families to come together.

Transportation will be available for registrants in the MetroWest area, south of Boston, and through a major MBTA station, so that Camp is accessible to registrants of every community in Greater Boston.

Open to any families coping with the death of a loved one, Camp Stepping Stones is free of charge following a non-refundable registration fee of $25 per family, which may be waived in cases of hardship. The registration deadline is Friday, July 1, 2016. For more information or to obtain a registration packet, please call Kristen Goodhue, Children’s Program Coordinator, at 978-750-9335 or email her at Camp@CareDimensions.org More information is also available at www.CareDimensions.org/camp.

 

 

 

 


Since 1978, Care Dimensions has provided comprehensive and compassionate care for individuals and families dealing with life-threatening illnesses. As the non-profit leader in advanced illness care, we offer services in more than 90 communities in Eastern Massachusetts.